"I understand the destruction that drugs can have on families and society and I am extremely remorseful for the mistakes I made when I was a teenager. Although apologising can’t change the past, I am so sorry. I have learnt many lessons and would dearly love the chance to return home to Australia and make a positive contribution to society."
My Story

 

My name is Scott Rush and since April 2005, I have been imprisoned in Bali, Indonesia. I was arrested when I was nineteen years old, and it was my first time travelling overseas. 

 

Prior to arriving in Bali, I had not been out of high school for long, and like a lot of teens, I didn't really know what I wanted to do in life at that time. I tried my hand at various things including construction and retail, before beginning the process of applying for a position in the Royal Australian Air Force. Growing up, I loved playing rugby league and rugby union, cricket and basically any other sports I could get my hands on. I enjoyed spending time with my family and I always had lots of pets, which I liked looking after.


This year, 2020, marks my 15th year in prison. People sometimes ask me what it feels like to have spent almost half of my life trying to survive in jail, but it’s a difficult question to answer because it’s all I know. I miss the simple things in life, like being able to have a shower, or sleep in a bed, or regularly see and talk to my loved ones back home. 

 

During my time here, I have retained my interest in sport by coaching the locals when possible, and they seem to take it on very well. It is difficult to enrol in formal study as I don’t have access to the internet, computers, or a phone, so I do my own independent study using materials that people bring me when they come to visit. I love reading and have tried to keep my mind sharp by always having a few books on the go at any given time. I've also continued to take time for my religious studies and am an active participant in regular church services.
 
I try my best to stay mentally strong and keep my focus on a brighter future, although it is really difficult when there is no light at the end of the tunnel. I have been in some very dark places and it is a struggle to remain positive, but all I can do is keep trying, and hope that one day soon I will be able to return home. 

 

I have had a lot of time for reflection over the years and I’d like to think I am a much more mature and wise person now than the boy I was when I came here. I understand the destruction that drugs can have on families and society and I am extremely remorseful for the mistakes I made when I was a teenager. Although apologising can’t change the past, I am so sorry. I have learnt many lessons and would dearly love the chance to return home to Australia and make a positive contribution to society.

 

I am so grateful for my parents and supporters who have stood by me for all of these years and I appreciate everyone who has shown that they care. I am thankful to anyone who has taken the time to visit me in jail or write kind letters and messages to both myself and/or to politicians in order to advocate for my release.

 

Thank you for visiting this site, your support means a lot.

- Scott  

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